Thursday, September 27, 2007

Multi-classing monks. Why not?

Apparently Dave Noonan is not only reading our blog, but he's also monitoring our Google chat. That sly devil. ;-)

Just the other day Crwth and I briefly discussed monks and multi-classing which brought to light that my current character is pretty blatantly illegal. Oops. We are using the Unearthed Arcana's variant rules on gestalt characters, so that's my loophole. Yeah. That's it.

Anyways, in Dave's latest blog he discusses how the multi-classing restrictions applied to the monk and paladin classes were regrettably left in 3.0/3.5. I curse those playtesters who advised keeping that insane and pointless restriction in the game. I wish I could smack them around a little.

As Dave says, "The path of the paladin "requires a constant heart," but a cleric or a druid can multiclass freely? The dedication and study of a monk exceeds that of a wizard? Baloney."

I whole heartedly agree. It just doesn't make sense on any level. In fact, it's the main reason I've never played a 3.0/3.5 monk or paladin. Even when I've felt the urge to play a lawful character, I just can't get over the multi-class restrictions. Too bad because I had a really fun idea for a cowardly paladin/rogue. And a monk/rogue would be damn cool too.

Oh well. Maybe in 4e.

Damn playtesters.

5 comments:

Seefi Lus, Yuan-ti Knight of the Temple of the Silent Ones said...

Lol, when 4.0 comes around, I'm definently not converting. I like my Dark Sun monk the way he is (Yuan-ti, 20 monk, 10 Seer [psion]).
But more importantly, cross-classing is fun, but I chose to do it AFTER 20th monk. With my Psion levels, I can do lots of cool stuff (hammer, psionic leap, etc.), and I know there are many other insane combinations out there.

Anonymous said...

In Forgotten Realms, monks and paladins can multiclass, with some restrictions.

Nick said...

Many of the class options and prestige classes in Oriental Adventures may freely multiclass with Monk. Additionally, in that setting, Monks may freely multiclass. It stands to reason a GM should permit any base class from that book to multiclass with Monk.

Nick said...

Many of the class options and prestige classes in Oriental Adventures may freely multiclass with Monk. Additionally, in that setting, Monks may freely multiclass. It stands to reason a GM should permit any base class from that book to multiclass with Monk.

Apopas said...

"The dedication and study of a monk exceeds that of a wizard?"

Absolutely! Monks try to find perfection for both mind and body. They treat them equally and consider them as one. To achieve that they dedicate themselves totally through mundane life, absolute devotion and actions that are punishmenets for others. Wizards on the other hand care only for the power of their will, to control and understand magic. They don't care if they are even cripple. Monks do.
A monk could fast for his whole life, or meditate alone on the top of a mountain for 10 continual years to understand and control totally himself and not a foreign force like arcane and divine magic, His only goal is PERFECTION in a manner different than the bowman who wants to become perfect with his bow. So there is no interest for him or even time to learn a different way of life which will turn his view in a different road than the raod which lead to perfection. Monks are the most lawful of the lawful. Last of all will break a tradition or a promise, or will change his life if at all.
For all these and other reasos, a monk can not become rogue or learn the secrets of the druids etc or if he does finally, then that means he couldn't find interest/meaning in the monkish life and refused that way to become something different than monk. But yet how easily can be roleplayed a monk of 10th lvl (almost a demigod) who achieved all these through the power of his will to just change his life totally?
Even if is cool and fun for the game mechanics to play a monk/rogue, is just powerplay in reality while a rogue/monk (a rogue who decided to become monk finally) is more logical.
And I'll close as I begun.
YES! The dedication and study of a monk, absolutely exceeds that of a wizard!